Pilgrim Weaver: Starting Out

I am pleased to feature a Camino reflection written by a woman who completed the Camino Francés in May 2017. Sister Anita Fearday from Teutopolis, Illinois, made the pilgrimage to Santiago to celebrate three events in her life—her seventieth birthday, fiftieth anniversary of vowed religious life, and fortieth anniversary of missionary work in Bolivia.

Estoy complacida de difundir una reflexión, escrita por una mujer que acaba de hacer el Camino Francés en mayo de 2017.  Hna. Anita Fearday de Teutopolis, Illinois,  hizo la peregrinación a Santiago para celebrar tres eventos importantes en su vida: el haber cumplido setenta años de vida; sus bodas de oro como religiosa Adoratriz de la Sangre de Cristo; y, el aniversario de cuarenta años como misionera en Bolivia.

Para continuar en español, clic aquí.

Weaving Words and Photos into the Tapestry of My Life
by Sister Anita Fearday

A weaving Anita did to prepare for the pilgrimage

A weaving that Anita did to prepare for the pilgrimage

Pilgrimage to Santiago—April 16, 2017 to May 18, 2017

Part One: Starting Out

Yikes! What did I get myself into? A symphony of strangers snoring in this dorm of 114 beds, coed toilets, showers, and bunk beds for the next month.

Zzzzz-zzzzz-zzzzz—Night in Pamplona

Zzzzz-zzzzz-zzzzz—Night in Pamplona

Send-off in Madrid by my ASC Sisters (Adorers of the Blood of Christ) before I began the Camino

Send-off in Madrid by my ASC Sisters (Adorers of the Blood of Christ) before I began the Camino

First Day: Muruzábal

I am learning to follow the yellow arrows and shells. After 23 km, I was a bit discouraged and tired of walking. I spent the night with some wonderful pilgrims who were encouraging. Three were Canadians, two Australians, and one South African. We shared a nourishing meal together in El Jardin.

Me, Tim, Karen, Cindy, and Mike

From left: Me, Tim, Karen, Cindy, and Mike

Second Day: Villatuerta

It really helped to have a good night’s sleep. I celebrated Eucharist at 9 a.m. near Puente La Reina. What a bridge! It measures 110 meters by 4, with seven arcs, and was built in the eleventh century. Tonight I am sharing a dorm with the same five friends of last night. Today’s walk was easier, although the terrain was up-and-down. This area is full of grapes, olives, and cheeses. The weather could not have been any nicer.

Ponte La Reina (The Queen's Bridge)

The bridge, “La Reina” (The Queen)

I have two hot spots on my left foot near my bunion that could easily turn into blisters. Almost all the pilgrims on the Camino become experts on foot problems and care, so I got lots of advice, and Compeed seems to be the solution.

Paella, our evening meal

Paella, our evening meal

Third Day: Viana

Today I walked between 25 and 26 km. My feet are better, and I am doing fine with my backpack and hip sack. In the morning, I filled up my water bottle at the Irache winery with rich red wine. The winery provides 100 liters a day for the pilgrims that pass.

Helping myself to the wine

Helping myself to the wine

Shortly after this, I chose to walk an alternative route through a forest. I wanted to be more solitary today and listen to the Camino. Today, Cecilia, a nurse from Australia, and Tim, a man who works in search and rescue operations from Canada, and I decided to make a short day of it and walk some 17 km. It was either that or walk 27 km, since there is no village between those points. Cecilia and Tim have become good friends of mine. On my first day, they took me under their wings. We don’t see much of each other during the day, but we connect at night.

I thought, today, I might share a bit of pilgrim-culture etiquette and routine with you. A typical day starts about 6:30 a.m., or earlier. It is still dark when we repack our backpacks and get on the road, so we can do most of our walking before 3 p.m., the warmest part of the day. That also enables one to have a better selection of lodging for the night, since most albergues (pilgrim hostels) have a first-come, first-served policy. During the day, we weave in and out of the lives of other pilgrims on the way. The common pilgrim greeting is “buen Camino,” which means “good travels.” We eat breakfast and lunch somewhere along the way, and when we arrive at our set goal, our energy runs out. We check into an albergue, get a bunk, and begin washing clothes. We need to wash them early, so our clothes have time to dry before we leave the next morning. Most pilgrims have just one change of clothes. In some albergues, for an additional fee, there is a communal evening meal prepared. Breakfast, too, is often a possibility. The Camino lends itself to community living.

Pilgrim weaver

Anita, Pilgrim Weaver

Fourth Day: Navarrete

I walked 22 km from Viana to Navarrete. Once again, it was beautiful weather, and the terrain was more level. As I walked through the big city of Logroño, population 150,000, another nurse from Australia invited me to a coffee and roll. I told her about my other nurse friend, Cecilia from Australia. As we were departing, who should appear on the scene, but Cecilia. It was a Camino kind of coincidence. Cecilia and I walked the last 13 km together. We ate the light lunch in a park as we watched the ducks and carp.

An almond tree

An almond tree

Fifth Day: Azofra

Yesterday we stayed at Hostel El Cantaro (the Earthen Ware Jug) in Navarrete. The little village is known for its pottery because the clay of that area is excellent for making ceramics and they have the skilled artisans to go with it. In the church, there are sculptures of Saints Rufina and Justa, the patron saints of potters.

Tim and I with the Potter

Tim and I with the Potter

Last night, Tim, Cecilia, and I found a lovely restaurant that sold pizza and sangria. It seems I have a voracious appetite on the Camino. They say it is hard to make the Camino without losing weight because one burns up many calories, so I am trying to eat enough to maintain my weight. This morning, we left at 7 a.m. looking for a place to eat breakfast. We walked for two hours and found nothing, so Cecilia and I walked another 2 km out of the way to find a town that sold something. We both had run plumb out of fuel. After breakfast, we bought a little reserve for the way and then walked another kilometer to connect to the path of Santiago. It was a fine day. About 2:30 p.m., we reached our destination, Azofra.

Sixth Day: Grañón

This morning, I noticed there was a gaping hole at the bottom of my hip bag, and I nearly had lost my tablet and sunglass case. Cecilia used her first-aid skills and came to my rescue.

Cecilia, having mended my hip sack

Cecilia, having mended my hip sack

After walking some 15 km, we arrived in Santo Domingo, where we ate tapas, the typical finger food of the area, and drank the beer with lemon, which has become one of my favorite drinks. There was a lovely 1 p.m. Mass in the cathedral for pilgrims, and it was full. There is a legend explaining why there is a live rooster and hen that live in a henhouse in the cathedral.

St. Dominic is depicted with a rooster and hen

St. Dominic is depicted with a rooster and hen

Seventh Day: Villambistia

What a difference one week on the Camino can make! I enjoyed the lovely walk today, and I can move at a faster pace, while still taking in the beauty of the countryside. I also feel more secure and am developing new muscles. Meeting new people from so many countries is very enriching.

Eighth Day: Ages

I left about 6:45 this morning in the dark. Within the first kilometer, it began to rain. I soon met Cecilia, and we walked the next dozen kilometers together through the pine forest. We stopped to see the monastery of San Juan de Ortega and soon arrived in Ages, a “one-stork town.” The storks in Spain tend to make their nests in bell towers. A big town may have four storks in residence and be known as a four-stork town. Ages has only one stork nest, and I saw the mother feeding the young.

Stork feeding her young

Stork feeding her young

Up next, part two: on the way.


Read more pilgrim interviews and Camino reflections.

If you’d like to contribute your Camino story, use the comment form below or email me with your text, photos or video. The guidelines are simple. Introduce yourself, describe what Camino route(s) you’ve experienced, and share what the Camino provided for you. It can be a personal essay, or a short and sweet reminiscence.  If you are a Bay Area resident or visitor and would like to set up an in-person interview, let me know! I can produce short videos and help you bring your Camino story to life.


Spanish Translation:

Tejedora Peregrina: embarcándome

Peregrinación a Santiago—16 de abril hasta 18 de mayo de 2017

Parte Uno: Embarcándome

¡Caramba!  ¿En qué me estoy involucrando por todo un mes?  ¿Voy a poder aguantar esta sinfonía de gente roncando en un dormitorio de 114 literas?

Zzzzz-zzzzz-zzzzz—Night in Pamplona

Zzzzz-zzzzz-zzzzz—Noche en Pamplona

Send-off in Madrid by my ASC Sisters (Adorers of the Blood of Christ) before I began the Camino

Despedida en Madrid con mis Hermanas Adoratrices de la Sangre de Cristo antes de empezar el Camino.

Primer Día: Muruzábal

Estoy aprendiendo a seguir las flechas amarillas y las vieras.  Después de los primeros 23 km., estaba un poco desanimada y cansada de caminar.  Pasé la noche con algunos peregrinos que me animaban.  Tres de ellos han sido canadienses, dos australianas, y una mujer de África del Sur.  Compartimos juntos una comida excelente en El Jardín.

Me, Tim, Karen, Cindy, and Mike

Izquierda a derecha:  Tim, Karen, Cindy, Mike y Yo

Segundo Día: Villatuerta

Me ayudó bastante el tener una buena noche de dormir.  Participé en la celebración la Eucaristía cerca al Puente La Reina.  ¡Qué puente!  Mide 110 metros por 4, con siete arcos.  Fue construido en el siglo once.  Esta noche estoy compartiendo un dormitorio con los mismos cinco amigos de anoche.  La caminata fue más fácil hoy, aunque hubo bastantes altibajos.  Esta área está llena de uvas, aceitunas, y quesos.  El clima ha sido casi perfecto.

Ponte La Reina (The Queen's Bridge)

El Puente, “La Reina”

Tengo dos ampollas pequeñas en mi pie izquierdo que podrían volverse  problemas.  Casi todos los peregrinos en el Camino llegan a ser expertos en problemas podiales (de pie), y por eso recibí bastantes consejos.  “Compeed” parece ser la solución.

Paella, our evening meal

Paella, nuestra comida para la noche

Tercer Día: Viana

Hoy caminé entre 25 y 26 km.  Mis pies están mejor y estoy manejando bien mi mochila y mi bolsa alrededor de mi cadera.  En la mañana yo llené mi botella de agua, con rico vino rojo en la Bodega de Irache.  Esta bodega provee 100 litros de vino para los peregrinos que pasan por allí.

Sirviéndome el vino.

Sirviéndome el vino.

Después de eso, yo decidí tomar una ruta alternativa por la selva.  Yo quería estar más solitaria el día de hoy y escuchar al Camino.  Una enfermera de Australia, y Tim, un hombre que trabaja en operaciones de búsqueda y rescate en Canadá, están llegando a ser buenos amigos.  En la primera noche de mi trayectoria, ellos me orientaban y me cuidaban. Durante los días no nos vimos mucho, pero nos contactamos en las noches.

Imagino que ustedes, que están leyendo esto, tendrían interés en conocer más la cultura y la rutina de un/a peregrino/a.  Un día típico empieza más o menos a 6:30 o más temprano.  Todavía es oscuro cuando nos acomodamos nuestras mochilas y empezamos a caminar, para poder hacer la parte pesada antes de las 3 p.m., cuando el calor es más fuerte.  También esto nos hace posible una mejor selección en el alojamiento, puesto que casi todos los albergues tienen la política de que los que llegan primero, tienen las primeras opciones en cuanto a las literas.  Yo, por supuesto, prefiero una litera abajo.  Durante el día tejimos nuestras vidas con las vidas de nuestros compañeros peregrinos.

Anita, la Peregrina Tejedora

Anita, la Peregrina Tejedora

El saludo común es “Buen Camino”.  Tomamos el desayuno y el almuerzo por el camino y cuando llegamos a nuestra meta o nuestra energía se acaba, nos inscribimos en un albergue y aprovechamos para lavar ropa.  Tenemos que lavar temprano para que haya tiempo para dejar secar la ropa antes que tener que salir en la mañana.  La mayoría de los peregrinos tiene solamente una muda de ropa.  En algunos albergues hay la posibilidad de una cena comunal y también de desayuno. El Camino se presta a estilo de vida en común.

Cuarto Día: Navarrete

Camine 22 km. de Viana a Navarette.  Una vez más, el clima fue agradable y el terreno más plano.  He paseado por la gran ciudad de Logroño con una población de 150,000 personas.  Tome café y un pastel con una enfermera de Australia y mientras nos estábamos despidiendo, nos encontramos con mi otra amiga-enfermera también de Australia, Cecilia.  Fue una “coincidencia” como muchos encuentros en el Camino.  Cecilia y yo caminábamos juntas los últimos 13 km.  Almorzamos en el parque mientras mirábamos nadar los patos y las carpas en el lago.

An almond tree

Un árbol de almendra

Quinto Día: Azofra

Ayer nos alojamos en el refugio, El Cantaro, en Navarrette.  El pueblito es conocido por su alfarería porque la arcilla de esta región es excelente para hacer cerámica y tienen artesanos que dominan esta técnica.  En el templo hay dos esculturas de las patronas de alfarería, Santa Rufina y Santa Justa.

Tim y yo con el Alfarero

Tim y yo con el Alfarero

Anoche Tim, Cecilia y yo encontramos un restaurant hermoso que vendía pizza y sangría.  Tengo un gran apetito haciendo el Camino.  Se dice que quemamos muchas calorías en la peregrinación y casi todos los peregrinos pierden peso sin esforzarse.  Yo quiero mantener mi peso por eso estoy comiendo mucho más de lo que generalmente como.  Esta mañana salimos a las 7 a.m. buscando un lugar para desayunar.  Caminamos por dos horas sin encontrar nada.  Cecilia y yo decidimos dejar el Camino y tomar un desvío de 2 km. para llegar al próximo pueblo con la esperanza de comer.  Ya se acabó completamente nuestro “combustible”.  Después de un gran desayuno, compramos unos alimentos extra para nuestro tapeque.  Fue un día bonito y a las 2:30 p.m. llegamos a nuestro destino, Azofra.

Sexto Día: Grañón

Esta mañana vi un agujero grande al fondo de mi bolsa de cadera.

Casi perdí mi tableta y mis lentes de sol.  Cecilia uso sus materiales y aptitudes de primeros auxilios para remendar la situación.  Después de caminar unos 15 km., llegamos a Santo Domingo donde comíamos tapas, unos bocaditos típicos de esta región.  Tomamos una cerveza con limón que está llegando a ser mi bebida favorita.

 

Cecilia, having mended my hip sack

Cecilia, con mi bolsa ya remendada

A la 1 p.m. hubo una Misa en la catedral para los peregrinos.  El templo estaba lleno. Hay una leyenda explicando porque hay un gallo y una gallina viviendo en una jaula grande en la catedral.

Sto. Domingo con un gallo y gallina

Sto. Domingo con un gallo y gallina

Séptimo Día: Villambistia

¡Qué diferencia hace estar una semana en el Camino!  Me gustó mucho la caminata de hoy.  Yo puedo caminar ahora con un ritmo un poco más rápido y todavía apreciar la belleza del paisaje.  También me siento más segura y estoy desarrollando nuevos músculos.  Encontrarme con gente de diferentes países es una experiencia muy enriquecedora.

Octavo Día: Ages

Salí del albergue a 6:45 a.m., en la oscuridad.  Después de poco tiempo, empezó a llover.  Cecilia muy pronto me alcanzó y caminamos juntas por los próximos kilómetros a través de una selva de pinos.  Nos paramos en el monasterio de San Juan de Ortega y después de un rato llegamos a Ages, un pueblo de “una cigüeña”.  Las cigüeñas de España generalmente hacen sus nidos en los campanarios de las iglesias.  Un pueblo grande puedan tener hasta cuatro cigüeñas residentes y se conocen como “un pueblo de cuatro cigüeñas”, resaltando el tamaño del pueblo por el número de cigüeñas residentes.  Ages solamente tiene un nido de cigüeña y he podido ver a la mamá dando de comer a sus pequeños.

Una cigüeña alimentando a sus hijitos

Una cigüeña alimentando a sus hijitos

Digame, por favor.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s